One Pattern, Three Options, Dozens of Boxes

Well, we’re rounding the corner on Fiberista Club’s first shipment, and so far, things could have been a lot worse! We didn’t make it to the level of a Fiber Armageddon, and it looks like the last of the boxes will trickle in to members over the next few days.

I had the opportunity to design the first pattern for the club, mostly because I’m too much of a micro-manager to have trusted it to anyone else. I’d like to present my first legitimate pattern, Winter Woods, available in both a cowl and two infinity cowl formats:

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What do you guys think?!

The pattern is only available to Fiberistas for the first three months of its publication, and so far has received some really great feedback!

I’m currently knitting the infinity scarf version for the knit-a-long we’re hosting on Ravelry, and I think I’ll spend some much needed time on my spinning wheel over the weekend since there’s about a week of down time before we gear up for February’s shipment.

Ah, knitting and spinning – my zen needs a reboot, and I’m beyond excited to be able to devout some “me” time within my two favorite hobbies.

About Hunter Liam

Hunter's grandmother had him making buttons and threading her sewing machine at the age of three. Ever since then, he's been obsessed with making things with his hands as a form of creative expression.Knitter, spinner, designer, writer, photographer, dancer . . . or just a creative soul with ADD.

Let’s Rock 2015, Ya’ll!

Like most, I begin 2015 with an uplifted spirit and the best of intentions to stay committed and disciplined to my many interests, including this blog. It’s been good to me – I’ve met a lot of wonderful people here, and have had opportunities sent my way most people would absolutely drool over. I’m grateful for 2014 and what it has done for this blog, even without my ability to provide a regular posting schedule. Thank you, everyone for your past and continued support.

To say last fall kicked my bum would be an understatement – for some reason, I thought it would actually be easy to take six classes and work full time and volunteer and maintain a household and knit and blog and start my novel and go to the gym and find time to do the simple, basic human things like take a shower or properly use sleep as a method of rest and rejuvenation.

It was a difficult twelve weeks, and I struggled quite a bit to maintain everything. Unfortunately, my knitting time and this blog suffered. I’m happy to report I earned straight A’s (well, one B+ but given the course load I’m calling it straight A’s) and I’ve learned my lesson: slow and steady wins the race. There’s really no rush, and I’ve decided to remain in part-time standing for now just to give life some room to breathe.

In other news, Mr. Joseph and I also launched a business this year, and we’re very, very excited about the possibility it presents to us to combine all of our favorite skills and passions.

Fiberista Club – a yarn and fiber subscription service – officially launched at the beginning of December, just as I was placing the finishes touches on my final term paper. It’s been great fun, and we actually sold out of our first month’s boxes.

I can’t reveal any details here, but I did have the opportunity to design for the club and I’m excited to be able to release it into the world (well, the Fiberista world) within the next week or so.

I owe you some photos, and since most of my knitting time has been for the club, I can’t publish them here until they are officially released. However, we are using mood boards as our inspiration for the yarn box contents every month, and since these were officially published today, I can go ahead and post them here for you:

febneutral febwarm febcoolThe club is up to my yarn snob standards:  we feature two skeins of handyed yarn or a minimum of 8 oz. of spinning fiber in our boxes, which are shipped on the very first Monday of every month. Membership is at a nominal rate, and the products included within the box are discounted – it’s an opportunity to provide fabulous knitters and spinners with premium goods for their projects at a bargain rate.

We just finished shipping our very first boxes this past week:

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I’m in love! If you’d like more information regarding Fiberista Club, visit the blog or the shop.  You can also check out our Ravelry group, the Fiberista Clubhouse. We’d love to have you as a Fiberista!

Well, that’s all for now everyone. I wanted to update you a bit, but we’re hitting 2015 with a vengeance around here. I’ll be back soon to share my latest knitting and yarn splurging updates (I haven’t shared what I purchased at Vogue Knitting LIVE! this year!).

 

About Hunter Liam

Hunter's grandmother had him making buttons and threading her sewing machine at the age of three. Ever since then, he's been obsessed with making things with his hands as a form of creative expression.Knitter, spinner, designer, writer, photographer, dancer . . . or just a creative soul with ADD.

For Cats, By Cats

Cats love yarn and wool – it’s a fact.

Depending on the age and personality of your little feline friend, they may choose to interact with your (their) yarn or wool differently.

Dexter – our oldest and the only boy – likes to snuggle up with roving, wrap it around his paws and body, and left to his own devices takes about ten minutes to look like “Mummy-Cat”, running around the house with a fluffy train reminiscent of Princess Diana’s wedding dress.

He knows exactly where I store everything, and each time I open a specific wardrobe or closet, he’ll storm into the room knowing he has an opportunity to sneak inside and swim around in piles of wool. It starts off as cute, then gets slightly annoying, and then I realize I’m just jealous that I don’t have enough wool to roll around in just like him. One day . . .

Yarn is where Dexter’s interest begins to wane and Suki, the baby, gets involved. Dexter could care less about a ball of yarn I’m knitting with or my baskets upon baskets of yarn stored in my studio. Suki, however, lives for chasing yarn tails around the house, pawing at my working yarn, or cuddling up inside one of the baskets. Oftentimes, since she’s such fabulous ginger cat, she’ll blend in with the yarn and I won’t realize that she’s stuck in the studio until she wakes up from her nap and I can see her pawing at the glass door so she can be let out.

And what about Mila? Well, she prefers finished objects. Mila is a lap cat, but will only sit on a blanket or other piece of warm, fuzzy fabric. In the summer, we’ll blast the air conditioning just to get it cold enough to justify a lap blanket – Mila will just meow until you place it on your lap so she can have a seat. In the winter, she’s most content – there’s plenty of knitting in my lap when she’s ready to sit down, and while it makes turning my work difficult sometimes, I’ve really gotten used to it. Once I place the work down on the couch to step away though, all bets are off. She’ll cuddle with a WIP and gets really angry when I attempt to pick my knitting back up – I tell myself it is the universe’s way of telling me I should take some time to tidy, clean, do laundry, etc., and entertain myself until she’s done.

I appreciate the predictability and balance. Dexter isn’t interested unless I’m spinning. Suki only cares about yarn when I’m winding it from a skein into a cake, and Mila doesn’t really come calling until the project is big enough to lay on, which takes a while. All and all, there isn’t a lot of cat interference in my fiber world, and I know I’m blessed.

This all changed with Pagewood Farm’s Plumes. Wool AND feathers is the catnip of the fiber world for my feline children, and as happy I was to finally utilize the yarn (it’s been sitting in my stash for over a year) and make a fun, warm hat for Mr. Joseph, it was a battle to keep all three cats away from it long enough for me to get anything done.

Mila was chewing on the feathers from yarn still wound up in a ball, Suki was busy pawing at my working yarn, and Dexter decided to rub up against the back of my neck (I tension my yarn there), sniffing away obsessively at the wool. The only conclusion I can make is that a collective of cats is responsible for designing Plumes. If a representative from Pagewood could confirm this, it would be appreciated (and please put a warning on the label).

I literally had to lock myself in a room to finish this project. Only a few feathers were lost in the process, and I’m very happy with the finished look:

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Plumes will be my first pattern on Ravelry. I’m writing it up, and looking for test knitters, so if you have a skein lying around (one skein and a complimentary chunky yarn will be enough yardage to makeup to two medium/large sized adult hats) or would be interested in investing in the materials to test knit this hat, please feel free to either message me here or email me: tandemknits@gmail.com.

I’ll be looking for test knitters through the month of March, with a pattern release slated for the first week of April. Yay!

In the meantime, it’s back to the blanket border knitting for me. Happy Friday, everyone!

About Hunter Liam

Hunter's grandmother had him making buttons and threading her sewing machine at the age of three. Ever since then, he's been obsessed with making things with his hands as a form of creative expression.Knitter, spinner, designer, writer, photographer, dancer . . . or just a creative soul with ADD.