Yarn, Yarn Everywhere & Not A Yard To Stitch

I’m in the middle of a crisis I have never experienced in six years of knitting and I don’t know what to do.

I only have one sweater that’s only one sleeve away from completion in my WIP basket.

This reality has created a sense of urgency for me to settle on my next project, and after hours upon hours of Ravelry searches, winding up skein after skein of yarn waiting to be paired with the perfect project, I have yet to be inspired, and I’m worried.

I don’t understand this.

I understand writer’s block – I’ve experienced that enough in life, especially during the last eight months of blog writing.

I understand sketching block – sometimes I don’t know what I want to create, and it’s hard to get my imagination and hands aligned into a purposeful rhythm that produces an acceptable result.

I completely get running around the house chasing the light while trying to get the perfect yarn or project picture, attempting to get the correct angle or intriguing accouterments to add depth to the photo.

Knitting block? Never happened. Ever. I have at least been able to settle for some nicely ribbed scarf to pass the time away, or convinced myself to swatch a few new pattern stitches so I can learn a new skill – by at this moment, right now, I’m not captivated by anything specific.

I’m scared. Please help. What are you working on? What’s your new favorite yarn? I have do to something to get through this dry spell. 24 hours of non-knitting has been more than enough, and the sweater desperately needs some company.

About Hunter Liam

Hunter's grandmother had him making buttons and threading her sewing machine at the age of three. Ever since then, he's been obsessed with making things with his hands as a form of creative expression.Knitter, spinner, designer, writer, photographer, dancer . . . or just a creative soul with ADD.

Making Up For A Lost Hour

Due to dubbing my Saturday a Sunday, Sunday turned into Saturday, which meant that I had procrastinated myself into a corner I couldn’t readily ignore the way I wanted to: by curling up into a consoling fetal position with my knitting and damning the consequences of the real world.

After waking up and getting a late start, I decided to ignore anything fiber related until I had gotten at least most of my to-do list done. This wouldn’t normally be such a hard line to cross – I generally allow myself a congratulatory blog entry readying or Ravelry pattern search after each completed task – but a lack of clean underwear kept undermining and delaying a shower, and I refused to step out into public with the smell of Saturday lingering in the air behind me, so it seemed appropriate to buckle down and get to business as soon as my feet hit the floor in an effort to stop the snowballing from rendering the entire day utterly useless.

I chugged a larger-than-normal-but-average-for-me cup of coffee and allowed it to fuel my body as I dangled the proverbial knitting carrot (and this blog entry) in front of me as a reward for a job well done.

Well, friends, after seven loads of laundry, a futile attempting at riding the house of cat hair (I literally sweat like I was in a Zumba class while I was dusting and vacuuming), two loads of dishes (thank you dishwasher), a fridge clean out that could rival an episode of Hoarders, completing an essay for one very tough employment law class, and charging every peripheral electronic in the house (there is no worse thing than realizing your e-reader is dead at the beginning of your Monday morning bus ride), I finally sat down to focus on the one thing I wish I had been able reserve the whole day for: knitting.

The M&V baby blanket had a minimal amount of work left. I quickly bound off the two remaining edges, wove in the ends, and convinced my iron to cooperate during one very intense steam blocking session (as if there’s any other kind). Here, dear friends, is the end result:

IMG_7074 IMG_7080 IMG_7076 IMG_7117

I had only a sliver of light left in the day by the time I was done and was happy to have a few great shots by the time I sat down to edit the photos and write this post.

The gray color used in the body and edging is a lovely textured alpaca yarn by Black Wolf Farms that I picked up at Vogue Knitting LIVE! this last year. The brownish-red color you see is fabulous llama yarn I picked up from Long Island Livestock Co., also at Vogue Knitting LIVE!, but during its premiere in Chicago in 2012.

Both are about a fingering weight yarn, so the blanket is wonderfully soft and light, as well as incredibly warm. I purposely wanted to create something with a little less bulk than usual, and am glad I went with my gut, even though it extended the finish line from about a month worth of knitting time to two. The end result is so completely worth it.

This lovely gift is being wrapped up and delivered tomorrow so mom and dad can have it readily available for when baby arrives in about a week. We’re all so excited to welcome their little man into the world.

Congratulations, Mike & Val!

 

About Hunter Liam

Hunter's grandmother had him making buttons and threading her sewing machine at the age of three. Ever since then, he's been obsessed with making things with his hands as a form of creative expression.Knitter, spinner, designer, writer, photographer, dancer . . . or just a creative soul with ADD.

You Made That?!

  1. It looks like Chicago may just be getting out of this winter within the next 10 days.
  2. I keep saying “In the next 10 days I can . . .” as a precursor to everything cabin fever related.
  3. Cabin fever related items include:
    • wearing something other than the one pair of shoes I committed to sacrificing to the Winter Goddess before the season’s first snowfall,
    • paying monthly heating bills equivalent to 50% of my mortgage (January and February would have paid for my Kromski Polonaise),
    • not worrying about the car [literally] being frozen to the ground,
    • bundling up like this, even when it’s just to throw out the trash or go into the basement to do laundry:
    • the laundry can sit in the washer for as long as I want without it turning into a weird, textile ice cube,
    • I can open the windows to hear birds chirping, rather than searching the internet and Pandora for sounds of life that make me a feel a little less alone in the universe,
    • Get. Me. Away. From. The. Cats.,
    • the porch, a cup of tea, and some spring knitting or design sketching – or really, just sitting in fresh air without it freezing my nostrils closed,
    • I can stop  phone stalking some of the places I’ve visited within the last year – Portland, Boston, Los Angeles, and San Juan – and asking myself ‘Why don’t I live there?”.
  4. If the winter isn’t really transitioning into spring within the next 10 days, I figure on March 13th I can say “Only 10 more days . . . ” and be at least 70% probable of correctness the second time around. I’m okay with this.
  5. The only way I can really get through the final stage of the season is with this justification: “At least I can get a little more time with my heavier handknits before they’re put away for the season”.
  6. In perfect support and trust of this optimistic statement, I chose to wear my Collegiate Cardigan for the first and only time this year (it’s white, fluffy alpaca and sheds like a mother, but oh so soft and warm and lovely).
  7. As soon as I took my jacket off to reveal the cardigan in all its envy-generating glory, someone behind me shouts “Oh – WOW – Did YOU make that?”
  8. It’s Monday. I just trekked through snowstorm number 823 to get to work. Another day of awful hair. I can’t believe I put these tight jeans on after yet another weekend of over-eating. My reaction to the question?

Please, get me through this Monday.

About Hunter Liam

Hunter's grandmother had him making buttons and threading her sewing machine at the age of three. Ever since then, he's been obsessed with making things with his hands as a form of creative expression.Knitter, spinner, designer, writer, photographer, dancer . . . or just a creative soul with ADD.